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McKinney, TX 75071

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  /  categories   /  Cooking With Tea   /  The Differences Between Matcha, Sencha and Genmaicha, Plus an Ochazuke Tea Soup Recipe
ochazuke green tea soup recipe

The Differences Between Matcha, Sencha and Genmaicha, Plus an Ochazuke Tea Soup Recipe

Matcha, sencha and genmaicha are all Japanese green teas, but they are so very different and delicious in their own ways.

Green tea is good for the body and soul. During this unnerving time, take a relaxing tea break and get the added benefits of antioxidants and other nutrients. Green tea is minimally processed and full of goodness for you.

Despite being the same tea type, matcha, sencha and genmaicha each have a different flavor profile and unique tasting experience.  

MATCHA

Matcha leaves are dried and then ground into a very fine powder. When preparing a cup of matcha, you’re mixing powder into the water, and consuming the actual leaf. Matcha is the green tea used in the renowned tea ceremony of Japan.

Do you know the four principals of the Japanese tea ceremony? They are harmony (with people and with nature), respect (of others), purity (of the mind and the senses) and tranquility (peace of mind and appreciative of nature’s abundance).

Mix up a frothy cup of Peach Matcha Green Tea Powder and reflect on these wonderful elements in the days ahead. Vibrant green tea powder infuses into an equally vibrant brew. Our novel twist on matcha brings together the perfect amount of peach and sweetness to traditional matcha. Juicy stone fruit notes balance the green tea astringency. A refreshing lightness and grounding earthiness make for an enjoyable cup. This approachable matcha offers mellow, fruity freshness that is packed with flavor (and antioxidants!).

SENCHA

Sencha Supreme Green Tea

Sencha is the quintessential Japanese green tea and one of the most popular green teas worldwide. Sencha is steamed, unlike other green teas which may be baked or pan fired. Steaming preserves a deep green color of the leaves and produces a soft green liquor.


The dark, blue-green leaves of our Sencha Supreme are tightly compressed into a needle-like form. As they open during infusion, they release smooth, soft, broth-like aromas with hints of fresh ocean air. The hazy, green infusion is thick and sweet, with a distinctly vegetal flavor In each sip, you’ll also find a flavor known in Japan as umami—a satisfying, brothy richness. The aftertaste leans slightly toward the sweeter side of the flavor spectrum.

Need a super fruit boost? Try our Super Fruit Sencha which blends nutritious green tea with beneficial goji berries, lemongrass and pomegranate.

GENMAICHA

Organic Genmaicha Toasted Rice Green Tea

Love kale chips? Our Organic Genmaicha might be your new favorite green tea with aromas of toasted seaweed and savory-sweet popcorn and grain. Its balanced, bright flavor is grainy, sweet and green, green, green. The aftertaste is mellow, a gentle end to a flavorful brew.

Go even a step farther and make this green tea soup, which is our twist on ochazuke. Ochazuke is a traditional Japanese comfort food, and is a great way to use up leftover rice in the fridge!

Genmaicha Green Tea Ochazuke Rice Soup

  • 4 cups water
  • 4 teaspoons of Organic Matcha Genmaicha
  • 2 cups cooked white or brown rice
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 (5-oz) package dried mushrooms
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup sliced green onions

Cook rice according to directions on the package, and soak the dried mushrooms in cool water for 20-30 minutes, or as directed on the package.

Steep 4 cups of Matcha Genmaicha. Remember, the leaves and matcha powder are very delicate so don’t over steep. When ready, strain the tea leaves and pour the tea into a pot, bringing to a simmer. Whisk the eggs and drizzle them in, stirring slowly until they form little ribbons in the soup. Stir in soy sauce and mushrooms.

Portion out the rice into two bowls and layer the green tea broth over rice. Garnish with green onions, and enjoy!

Learn more about green tea on our Tea 101 page.

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